Tag - dnmodels

Under New Management Group Build

Publishing this article on the very first day after the final date of the Under New Management Group Build is not an accident. I nearly missed the deadline, being busy with other stuff including more modeling, but not only. The subject is very interesting from my perspective, since captured vehicles was always an interest for me, especially WWII vehicles that was captured by the Nazis, and re-painted in their insignia or in special schemes. Most of you probably know how beautiful looking are the Spitfires and the Mustangs with the yellow tails, and how odd-looking are the soviet or allied tanks with german crosses on. That being said, when Panzermeister36 /this is his nickname in YouTube/ announced that group build is coming, I was more than excited, with at least 10 options for captured vehicles to build for participation. Among these was Tirans /captured T-series from the IDF/, many support vehicles - Stalinetz, Voroshilovetz, GAZ trucks, and of course, my favorite subjects - tank killers and howitzers, like Su-152, JSU-152 and so on. Finally, just before I settled with Ambulance GAZ truck from MiniArt, I switched to T-70. I got this special edition kit from MiniArt themselves, but not being a fan of that tank I hesitated for a while. I built it, primed it, and then it got me - I should search for Nazi captured pieces, and make it that way. So just a month before the deadline I got into gear, and started modeling. I won't bother you with the whole process, instead at the end of this article I will add links to the building video and the Group Build video for Under New Management GB. I must say that overall, it is a very small tank, similar in size to Panzer IV in 48th scale from Tamiya, rather than a 35th scale armor model. Once built though, things change slightly, and model comes just into place for being a excellent piece of plastic in light tank area. With a bit of stress and some missed stages in weathering /like chips and some rust spots/ I managed to pull it off two days before the final date of the Group Build, and I needed one more day to let spirits settle. You can see from the pictures that there is a slight difference in the colors of the mud in the main wheels and the small wheels on the upper side. Everything eventually gonna come to one blended look, but it needs some time and the cold weather makes it even slower. All in all - this was a very nice experience, and could've been even better if more time was at hand. Or I made up my mind earlier. The final result is that I managed to squeeze into time frame, which I am very happy about, especially when I missed the STUG Life Group Build during the summer. Worth mentioning that the helmet on the side is from Vulcan Models and the tarp is from FT-17 from Meng, with some small additions of Milliput White to make it follow the curvature of the tank. The rest you can find below in the videos, and I hope that you will comment and eventually subscribe. Thanx to Panzermeister36 for the opportunity, that Group Build was pure fun! Enjoy, and stay tuned for more! You can get this kit here: T-70 from MiniArt Here are the videos: Building video GB Part 1 GB Part 2 GB Part 3 Final Reveal of the Completed T-70M and an inbox review:
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U.S. Armored Bulldozer – MiniArt #35188

Bulldozer kits of all kinds are rapidly entering the scale modeling world last couple of years. The big bang started with the Doobi D9R from Meng Model and continues with many others, different shapes and sizes of engineering vehicles used throughout the eras of wars. One of the latest that we got on the maret is MiniArt D7 version - an U.S. Armored bulldozer, kit number 35188. The vehicle was used in the end days of WWII, clearing the ruins of Germany's cities. These were sad times, but the dozer itself looks awesome.   Once again, I must note that the whole kit is made from the new material that MiniArt is going to use from late 2015 and onwards. This is very important while we speak about that bulldozer, because it is based on a D7 #35174, and that was the kit that caused me a lot of headaches with its cracking track pads, cracking lines, cracking handles, and overall, cracking everything. With a great sigh of relief, I must say - this is over! It is done! The new plastic material is very flexible, easy to work with and modeler-friendly. This is crucial regarding this exact model. It is a kit full with fiddly parts, it offers movable tracks, a whole bunch of handles for the driver and so on. All this, made from tiny and precise sub-assemblies needs to be done from flexible plastic. It just begs for it! So, almost year after we got the D7 #35174, MiniArt made a giant leap, going all the way to providing the great material alongside with a kit, which is standalone near-perfect! Yep, that's right, this kit, in his entirety is engineered in a manner that would satisfy the needs of the pickiest and most-pretentious scale modeler out there. But let's start from the beginning: It features more than 750 parts, including clear and PE material. It is a cabbed version, but beneath the cab we have enough to show the interior of it - a whole driver's compartment. Tracks are workable, blade seems workable enough as well /following the instructions/. On the rear of where was the winch on their first kit, we have two winch-likes motors, and it seems like these were for the dozer blade. Another cool difference is that the front radiator has a second covering plate, probably armored, which looks extremely detailed in plastic. The engine beneath that is wonderful, and it shows almost everything you can think of. Caterpillar signs, small handles, the fan, the belts, everything is there. The option to make it partially or fully visible is there of course. With so many details and small parts, the kit begs to be done in a attractive modeling manner, ripped, showing off what's inside. Unfortunately, there is only one painting option, but if you search the forums I am pretty sure you will find more. Another source is Tankograd publications. They have great book on D7 tractors, and inside you can find some pictures of the armored version of it. The more you look at the sprues of it, the more you fall in love with this kit. It is definitely not for a beginner, but it gives you so much, that you can barely comprehend it on the first  box opening. You gotta watch out with the tracks geometry, because the assembly is a bit tedious, but overall everything is easy to be build. The first D7 had almost perfect fit actually, and if it wasn't for the plastic, it would've been great. I really do hope they will re-issue that featuring the new material. From what I've built so far from MiniArt, I must say that their idea behind everything is amazing. From a small company, just out of nowhere, they became one of the heavy hitters on the market. And with these subjects....Wow! Highly recommended! Not only that, I strongly believe, that this is the BEST and the most attractive kit that MiniArt ever produced! You can get the kit here: U.S. Armored Bulldozer Other versions: D7 with Winch w/Angled Dozer Blade Clean Bulldozer Version You can watch the video review here: https://youtu.be/C2Yl4NZ5kSA
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IDF Puma from Hobby Boss #83868

I will leave to my friend Paul to tell you more about this kit. For me, this is quite an interesting subject. It is an IDF one, which means it is usually a weird looking armored vehicle, and it is a new release for 2015 from Hobby Boss. They move forward with high speed, and their kits are very competitive. The price is not high, nor too low either, but considering the size of the vehicle...well, check it out  the video to see. We are expecting couple more kits based on that same chassis: centurion tank. And they are Nagmachon, Nakpadon /maybe/, and Nagmachon with Doghouse. Hope they will be on the market as promised - by the end of 2015. So far we have this:  
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Zvezda BMPT Build

So after considerable amount of times postponing this project, I decided to start the build of it and get it done as soon as possible. I’ve started building Zvezda kit as a starter, because from what I saw opening the box, this one is the easier one to be built. The other that I will be building will be Meng Model BMPT, since the Trumpeter one is not yet released. The good news is, that there is a slight chance Trumpi making a slight turn to a BMPT-72, or Terminator 2, which is based on T-72, instead of T-90. That will give me even more to work with. So back to the Zvezda. I haven’t built a Russian kit from ages, not only because I am not a big fan, but also because they haven’t showed up for it with...anything. Well, that is changed now, with their T-90 line, which was warmly welcomed and includes this BMPT kit as well. Going through the parts of it, I can tell that there are just about enough. There aren’t many unusual complications compared to Meng, but on the other side, there are some letdowns. Like for example the plastic meshes, which are photo-etched in Meng’s set. Or the plastic material, which is clearly lower quality. With that said, I must note, that Zvezda kit is ages ahead of everything they have done so far. It is well engineered, well organized within the sprues and have some small shortcuts, like for example, the pre-sagged track lines. Onto the build - overall, it takes about 6-7 hours, maybe a little more, depending on how much energy one is putting into cleaning and fitting the parts. Compared to a Tamiya kit, every one of which is pretty much 5-5.5 hours built, this kit is not bad. And I am not trying to make it look bad, just the contrary. The Terminator is a complex vehicle, with a lot of parts over the upper hull, and its turret is made from various weapons systems, which means more detailing. Again, Zvezda somehow pull that off too, making it very neatly - a movable turret, with twin machine guns moving up and down. The alignment is easily done, and amazingly, movement is free and trouble-less. The fit of everything is tight, but yes, it works just fine! The suspension is not very complex, and I truly believe that is the way to go. Why? Well, because that is a armored vehicle with tracks, which means it goes dirty places, and it makes a total mess out of its belly. Besides, nobody, and I mean nobody checks the bottoms of the tanks at the shows. Even if they don’t have a vignette base or just a wooden pad - still, nobody checks. A movable tracks and suspension, which are extras we can find in Meng’s kit are a bit useless. They can come handy if you place the vehicle over curvy terrain on a diorama, but that is doable with a bit of extra work with a fixed suspensions as well. Zvezda’s biggest advantage according to my personal preferences is the fact that you have a track length consistent of several parts, like under 10 of them. There are two main lengths - upper with sags and lower, which sits beneath the wheels. The rest is pretty much several links that go over the idlers and sprockets and couple of more straight lines. This is a great time saver, especially when you don’t enjoy dealing with track links, like myself. One thing that I don’t liked in the kit was the transparent parts, which are a bit outdated as a quality. They are easily cracked, and do not allow just any glue around them. On the other side of that is the fact that again - we are dealing with armored vehicle, which ones inside of a muddy conditions, and everything becomes a mess more or less. So some dirt over the transparent parts won’t hurt anybody. The whole build took me more than a few days, because even not that much as working hours, some parts are fiddly and they need a break in between their treatment and assembly. Plastic looks a bit messy in the end of the build, but that is only because it’s quality is a bit of low level. However, once everything is primed, it appears even and without any problems at all. I was actually very surprised with the final appearance of the vehicle. Because it has very curvy surface with all that boxes and technical access panels, I needed to go with two hands of two primers. First I did it with Mr. Surfacer 1000, which covered the most of it, and then I did a go around with Surfacer 1200, which filled even the smallest stuff over it. In the end I got a nice looking vehicle, and I bet nobody, or at least very few people can recognize that this is Zvezda beneath the Surfacer. Even if you can tell, it looks great! The painting of the camouflage is another whole story, so this is for some other article, but a built of this kit was a lot of fun! The kit itself is a cheap one, so I highly recommend it to anybody interested in armor. Even though it is not a company very popular among modelers, Zvezda did the job perfectly, and they deserve a praise. More on that BMPT story to follow soon…. You can get the Zvezda kit here: BMPT Terminator
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